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NH has significant untapped potential to improve its economy by developing synergies between its industry and university research enterprises.
EPSCoR researcher Scott Ollinger will lead a team of UNH researchers on a new $1.25 million NSF grant to understand the impact of forest biodiversity on climate change.
Natural services, such as flood mitigation and water filtration, can not only be cost effective compared to engineered methods but also tend to come with other benefits. What's your natural capital?
Students: Deadlines are approaching for many of the graduate fellowship and undergraduate scholarship opportunities available from the Institute for Broadening Participation.
Students at the University of New Hampshire teamed up this summer to help protect the Great Bay and its burgeoning oyster industry.
UNH researchers want to know how climate change will affect water quality of streams in NH. But as those streams have dried up in this summer’s drought, collecting data has become limited.
Middle school girls create smartphone apps, and teachers observe and explore new ways to engage students in a learning lab. It's all part of the Creative Computing Challenge.
What is your idea that could change the world? The SVIC invites individuals and teams to identify pressing social or environmental issues and present an innovative approach to solving them.
NH and Alaska EPSCoR help open doors for remote native Alaskan high school students to spend four weeks at UNH's Project SMART.
Three faculty from UNH received nearly $1 million in awards from the U.S. Department of Energy EPSCoR to change the way we store data and convert sunlight into energy.
CSNE now provides a detailed analysis of past (1895-2012) and potential future (out to 2099) climate change for ten regions across New England and for New England as a whole.
Listen to EPSCoR researcher Scott Ollinger discussing the value of trees and current threats to forest health such as invasive insects and extreme weather on The Exchange on NHPR.
Read this story by summer intern Megan Verfaillie about her personal experiences working with the Stewardship Network: New England to keep the Great Bay healthy.
Some scientists suggest that the sediments that wash downstream after a dam is removed can play an important role in restoration.
Groundbreaking research at UNH scales down sophisticated global climate models to help us understand what we care most about: How is the climate in my backyard changing, and what will it mean for me?